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COVID-19 AND ADDICTION – RECOVERY USING ONLINE THERAPY

COVID-19 AND ADDICTION – RECOVERY USING ONLINE THERAPY

Author : Andrew da Roza

COVID-19 has posed a challenge to everyone, and those more physically vulnerable in our community clearly need our care and attention. 

There are also people whose mental vulnerability deserves equal care.

Mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety, and addictions are exacerbated by a pandemic crisis in multiple ways. 

Collective family and community fears are (in themselves) contagious; and the constant bombardment of medical and financial bad news, can leave those with mental illnesses lost in a cascade of negative rumination and catastrophising. 

The mentally ill and people with addictions commonly have compromised immune systems, and suffer stress or substance, tobacco and alcohol abuse related diseases – leaving them wide open to severe pneumonia with acute respiratory distress symptoms – and other complications from COVID-19. 

Isolation, separation and loneliness – caused by working at home and social distancing – are perhaps the worst contributors to: low mood; agitation; irrational fears; moments of panic; self-disgust; resentment; anger; and even rage.

People whose ability to pause, use reason and find practical solutions can be severely compromised. They may find themselves bereft of the motivation, and ability to engage in even the simplest tasks of self-care. 

Added to this, listlessness, boredom and frustration can lead to despair. Then self-harm and suicidal thoughts may arise, take hold, and even overwhelm them.

Those in recovery or active addiction may also turn to their compulsive and impulsive behaviours of choice, to sooth and find momentary respite from the moods and thoughts that have hijacked their mind. Triggers, urges and cravings may become relentless and unbearable. 

The solution may begin with finding a way out of isolation. 

Starting the journey out of this darkness can start with talking to people who can demonstrate unconditional positive regard, show kindness and compassion, and help reframe the situation. Such people can assist those suffering to put a name to and validate their emotions. 

In short – therapy can help!

In times of COVID-19, working with a therapist via teleconsultation can be effective using ZOOM, Skype, WhatsApp video and FaceTime. 

Although the calming and soothing sensation of the physical presence of a therapist is absent, for those in isolation – distraught with shame and despair – Internet enabled therapy can prove a lifeline.   

Isolation can be further broken, using similar Internet methods, by attendance in recovery groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous and Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous – all of whom now hold Zoom meetings in Singapore. 

These Zoom opportunities in Singapore are supplemented by Zoom, Skype and telephone conference meetings in Hong Kong and Australia (in Singapore’s time zone) and in the U.K. and the US (during our mornings and evenings).             

Having broken the isolation, the second step therapists can provide is guidance and motivation towards self-care. This would include tapering or abstinence from the addictive substances or behaviour. A well thought through relapse intervention and prevention plan, specifically tailored to a person’s triggers, will also assist.

Triggers may be particular places, situations, people, objects or moods. 

The acronym “HALT” is often used by those in recovery; which stands for the triggers of being: Hungry; Angry; Lonely; or Tired.

When these triggers arise, people are encouraged to 

  • HALT their behaviour; 
  • breathe deeply, with long outward breaths;
  • think through consequences;
  • think about alternatives;
  • consult with others; and
  • use healthy tools to self-soothe.      

Daily mindfulness, meditation, exercise, sleep hygiene, healthy eating and following a medication regime are important aspects of self-care – and for some suffering mental illness – these actions – and time – may be all they need to find their footing again.

Luckily, the Internet gives a vast array of possible self-care options, including things to distract us, soothe us and improve us. 

Everything is available from: calming sounds and music; guided meditations; games; home exercise, yoga and tai chi; self-exploration and improvement videos; video chats with loved ones; to healthy food delivery options. They can all be had with a few keystrokes. 

Today we live at a time when suffering from mental illness and addictions is commonplace. But we also live at a time when the solutions are literally at our fingertips – if we only reach out for them. 

For information on teleconsultation for addiction therapy and addiction recovery meetings, contact:  Andrew da Roza at Promises Healthcare by email to andrew@promises.com.sg or by calling the Promises Healthcare clinic at: (+65) 6397 7309 

 

   

 

Intrinsic motivation as a source of vitality?

Intrinsic motivation as a source of vitality?

“Vitality management is provided for organizations that have a vision”. A quote from Pauline van Dorssen, writer of “Vital People in a Vital Organisation”. This is a new successful training (NIP). Positive psychology and the use of vitality are central. The response from Occupational and Organisational Psychologists and Occupational Health Psychologists was exuberant, with all available places booked. In addition, the same question arises from organizations, who often need advice and coaching in the field of vitality.

To know more, here is the original article in Dutch language: Artikel_De Psycholoog_lisa van der Heijden

Written by Lisa van der Heijden, Clinical Psychologist.

If you are interested to know and learn more therapy for children/adolescents, contact Promises Healthcare for more information.

Care Community Fun Fair : 5 August 2017

Care Community Fun Fair : 5 August 2017

HMI Institute of Health Sciences in support of the FestivalForGood (organised by raiSE) invites you to join us for hands-on experiences on caregiving through training simulations and fun activities. Some takeaway knowledge include:

  • Knowing how to create a safe home environment for your aged parents/grandparents
  • Safe feeding skills for Caregivers
  • Understanding Caregivers’ stress & preventing/relieving these stresses
  • Understanding how your aged parents/grandparents feel
  • Recognising illnesses & emergencies
  • Simple skills on CPR

-and many more!

Our Career Coaches will also be around to assist you with information on our training programmes and career services.

Event Details

  • Date & Day: 05 August 2017 (Saturday)
  • 3 Sessions: 9:00am · 11:00am · 1:00pm
  • Venue:
    HMI Institute of Health Sciences @
    Devan Nair Institute for Employment and Employability, 
    80 Jurong East Street 21, #06-03, Singapore 609607

To know more information about this event, you can click here: link:http://hmi-ihs.com/index.php/care-community-fun-fair-05-aug-2017

The Relationship Between Media Multitasking and Executive Function in Early Adolescents

The Relationship Between Media Multitasking and Executive Function in Early Adolescents

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The increasing prevalence of media multitasking among adolescents is concerning because it may be negatively related to goal-directed behavior. This study investigated the relationship between media multitasking and executive function in 523 early adolescents (aged 11-15; 48% girls).

The three central components of executive functions (i.e., working memory, shifting, and inhibition) were measured using self-reports and standardized performance-based tasks (Digit Span, Eriksen Flankers task, Dots–Triangles task). Findings show that adolescents who media multitask more frequently reported having more problems in the three domains of executive function in their everyday lives.

Media multitasking was not related to the performance on the Digit Span and Dots–Triangles task. Adolescents who media multitasked more frequently tended to be better in ignoring irrelevant distractions in the Eriksen Flankers task. Overall, results suggest that media multitasking is negatively related to executive function in everyday life.

To read the full article: http://jea.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/02/17/0272431614523133.abstract

Written by Lisa van der Heijden, Clinical Psychologist, Susanne E. Baumgartner and Wouter D. Weeda.

Contact Promises Healthcare if you are interested to know and learn more therapy for children/adolescents.

NeuroStar TMS Therapy® for Depression

NeuroStar TMS Therapy® for Depression

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How Does NeuroStar TMS Therapy® Work?

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) uses a targeted pulsed magnetic field, similar to what is used in an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) machine. While the patient is awake and alert, NeuroStar TMS Therapy stimulates areas of the brain that are underactive in depression.2

NeuroStar TMS Therapy is an in-office treatment that takes 37 minutes, is performed while the patient sits in a chair, and is administered five days a week, for up to four to six weeks.

Simple steps for NeuroStar TMS Therapy:

  • Step One: The patient reclines comfortably in the treatment chair, awake and alert
  • Step Two: A small curved device containing the magnetic coil rests lightly on the patient’s head
  • Step Three: The device delivers focused magnetic stimulation directly to the target areas of the brain
  • Step Four: The patient can immediately resume normal activities

During treatment, the patient hears a clicking sound and feels a tapping sensation on the head. The most common side effect is generally mild-to-moderate pain or discomfort at or near the treatment area during the session. When this occurs it is temporary, and typically occurs only during the first week of treatment.

There are no effects on alertness or understanding; patients being treated with NeuroStar TMS Therapy can drive themselves to and from their treatment sessions. Above information is taken from: https://neurostar.com/neurostar-tms-depression-treatment/