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Evolving Trends Of Social Media And How It Impacts Youth

Evolving Trends Of Social Media And How It Impacts Youth

Social media trends.
Social media trends are constantly evolving in today’s information age.
Generation Z (individuals who are born between 1997 and 2012) are considered to be digital natives where they are surrounded by vast technological advances since birth (Seymour, 2019). In contrast to other generations like the Millennials (those born between 1981 to 1996) and Generation X (those born between 1965 to 1980), Generation Z grew up with social media, smartphones and rapid information sharing (Seymour, 2019).
There are many different types of social media and some examples include social networking sites, dating apps, gaming apps, blogging or vlogging platforms. Globally, the top ten most used social media platforms are Facebook, YouTube, Facebook Messenger, Instagram, WhatsApp, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Snapchat and Skype (Global Web Index, 2020). One of the latest additions includes TikTok, an app that comprises short entertaining videos created and enjoyed by younger users.

Impacts on youths

Given the increasing popularity of social media in recent years, it is undeniable that social media plays an important role in our society today. Social media provides a new lens for people to exchange information and interact with others. As youths enjoy their social connections with peers on social media platforms, the increased use of social media will likely pose a risk to their mental health and well being where they will feel anxious, depressed, lonely and the fear of missing out (FOMO) (Robinson & Smith, 2020). Youths also tend to compare their realities with other people’s best moments in which depicts an inaccurate representation of a person’s overall life (Robinson & Smith, 2020). Besides, youth may experience cyberbullying from others on social media platforms. As a result, youths will likely experience low self-esteem and psychological distress, anxiety or depressive symptoms.

Helping youths

Parents and teachers can assist youths by emphasising their youths’ values and strengths in relation to the different aspects of their lives in order to help them navigate the labyrinth of social media platforms. In addition, parents and teachers can focus on recognising signs which youths may exhibit when they are victims of cyberbullying such as social withdrawal, changes in mood and avoidance towards discussing their online interactions with others. Youths can also be encouraged by parents and teachers to seek counselling support if they find it difficult to manage unpleasant feelings related to their social media use. Please make an appointment to speak with one of our health professionals (a psychologist or counsellor) should youths require counselling support. 

Reference
Seymour, E. (2019, August 25). Gen Z: Born to be digital. VOA News, Retrived from: https://www.voanews.com/student-union/gen-z-born-be-digital
Robinson, L., & Smith, M. (2020, September). Social media and mental health. Help Guide, Retrieved from https://www.helpguide.org/articles/mental-health/social-media-and-mental-health.htm
Global Web Index (2020). Report: social media marketing trends. Global Web Index, Retrieved from: https://www.globalwebindex.com/reports/social
Intrinsic motivation as a source of vitality?

Intrinsic motivation as a source of vitality?

“Vitality management is provided for organizations that have a vision”. A quote from Pauline van Dorssen, writer of “Vital People in a Vital Organisation”. This is a new successful training (NIP). Positive psychology and the use of vitality are central. The response from Occupational and Organisational Psychologists and Occupational Health Psychologists was exuberant, with all available places booked. In addition, the same question arises from organizations, who often need advice and coaching in the field of vitality.

To know more, here is the original article in Dutch language: Artikel_De Psycholoog_lisa van der Heijden

Written by Lisa van der Heijden, Clinical Psychologist.

If you are interested to know and learn more therapy for children/adolescents, contact Promises Healthcare for more information.

The Relationship Between Media Multitasking and Executive Function in Early Adolescents

The Relationship Between Media Multitasking and Executive Function in Early Adolescents

The increasing prevalence of media multitasking among adolescents is concerning because it may be negatively related to goal-directed behavior. This study investigated the relationship between media multitasking and executive function in 523 early adolescents (aged 11-15; 48% girls).

The three central components of executive functions (i.e., working memory, shifting, and inhibition) were measured using self-reports and standardized performance-based tasks (Digit Span, Eriksen Flankers task, Dots–Triangles task). Findings show that adolescents who media multitask more frequently reported having more problems in the three domains of executive function in their everyday lives.

Media multitasking was not related to the performance on the Digit Span and Dots–Triangles task. Adolescents who media multitasked more frequently tended to be better in ignoring irrelevant distractions in the Eriksen Flankers task. Overall, results suggest that media multitasking is negatively related to executive function in everyday life.

To read the full article: http://jea.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/02/17/0272431614523133.abstract

Written byLisa van der Heijden, Clinical Psychologist, Susanne E. Baumgartner and Wouter D. Weeda.

Contact Promises Healthcare if you are interested to know and learn more therapy for children/adolescents.

Chill Skills – Managing Anger for 14 – 16 Year Olds

Chill Skills – Managing Anger for 14 – 16 Year Olds

A CBT-based approach to helping your teenager manage his/her anger.

Adolescents in this group will be encouraged to identify their angry feelings, problem solve and express them in various productive ways.

Parents will also be required to attend 2 sessions where they will be taught strategies to help support their child.

Thursday 4.30 – 5.30 pm
(9 week programme)

*Limited to 7 participants per group. Between ages of 14-16 years old.

Contact our clinic for more information.