Defeating Shame with Group Therapy for Sex Addiction - Promises Healthcare
ENQUIRY

The Paradox of Getting Started

Attending group therapy for compulsive sexual behaviours (sex addiction) is commonly very difficult.

The fear and shame associated with the compulsion, and the desire to hide and minimise the behaviour subsumes a person’s thoughts. This drowns their motivation to attend. Procrastination or an outright rejection of the benefits of therapy group becomes inevitable.

Ironically, it is the benefits of group therapy that would motivate a person to attend in the first place. But they not be willing to attend unless they get these benefits first.

A chicken and egg conundrum.

 

The Benefits of Group Therapy – Shame Busting

One of the main benefits is group therapy’s ability to “bust” shame and fear.  The same shame and fear that prevented the person from attending.

It is in a group environment of compassion, kindness and lack of judgment, that a person can find the courage to face their reality, and gain hope and purpose in their recovery.

In group, people discover that they are not alone in their secret thoughts, urges and cravings – and that they are not uniquely “broken”. It lifts the impossibly heavy weight of secrecy, lies and half-truths, that people carry – often for years.

They also find out that others – very much like them – have found a way to start a journey to change their behaviour, beliefs and feelings.

 

Sexual Compulsivity is an Issue of Intimacy

At its roots, sexual compulsivity is an issue of intimate relationships. Group therapy is therefore a uniquely effective way to learn how to build healthy relationships.

Having and maintaining personal boundaries and respecting the boundaries of others, is a skill set that can best be learned, and safely experimented with, in a group. Effective communication and emotion management are also learned skills – and a group of peers is the best place to practice them.    

Simply by interacting with someone struggling in similar ways, learning from them – and, in turn, helping them – enables recovery to bloom.

 

Group Therapy and Self Knowledge

One aspect of sexual compulsive behaviour is the struggle with self-knowledge.

A person struggling with compulsivity may common to ask: what motivates my behaviour; why this particular behaviour; why is volition and control so hard; why can’t I learn from my experience; how did I get my calculation of the risks so wrong?

In group therapy, we also ask: what needs is this behaviour really serving; is it really satisfying my longer-term needs; what is the price I am “paying” for dealing with my needs in this way; are there other ways to meet those needs at the “right price”; and what else can I do to meet my needs?

 

The “Mirror” of the Group members

By exploring these questions together in a safe space, a group can feedback their observations of each other’s journeys – and pool their collective wisdom.

Having a “mirror” of four to six people, reflecting back their experiences of who a person is, enables that person to truly see themselves as they are – perhaps for the first time.

 

Group Therapy – the Safe Space Rules

To create a safe space, the group therapy the rules are made clear.

Confidentiality is paramount. Further, members are encouraged to talk about themselves and their perspectives, and not assume or impose things on others.

Advice is offered only if expressly requested. Comments are positive and constructive; and a person’s strengths and skills are celebrated.

 

The Outcomes of Group Therapy

With the dark pall of shame lifted – what other outcomes can be expected from group therapy?

The benefits are many. Self-awareness, self-esteem, honesty, skilful management of relationships, emotions and communications – and greater motivation to stay the recovery course. 

Ultimately, not only does behaviour change, but so do perspectives and desires.

Needs are better understood and met. Purpose and meaning in life return – and having a full life becomes a probability –  not  just something other lucky people have. 

 

If you’re interested to start your CSBD group therapy journey, with a safe, non-judgmental and connected space for peer support and learning, you may want to consider writing in to clinic@promises.com.sg to be a part of our  Sex Therapy And Recovery (S.T.A.R.) program facilitated by Andrew da Roza.