ENQUIRY
The Relationship Between Media Multitasking and Executive Function in Early Adolescents

The Relationship Between Media Multitasking and Executive Function in Early Adolescents

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The increasing prevalence of media multitasking among adolescents is concerning because it may be negatively related to goal-directed behavior. This study investigated the relationship between media multitasking and executive function in 523 early adolescents (aged 11-15; 48% girls).

The three central components of executive functions (i.e., working memory, shifting, and inhibition) were measured using self-reports and standardized performance-based tasks (Digit Span, Eriksen Flankers task, Dots–Triangles task). Findings show that adolescents who media multitask more frequently reported having more problems in the three domains of executive function in their everyday lives.

Media multitasking was not related to the performance on the Digit Span and Dots–Triangles task. Adolescents who media multitasked more frequently tended to be better in ignoring irrelevant distractions in the Eriksen Flankers task. Overall, results suggest that media multitasking is negatively related to executive function in everyday life.

To read the full article: http://jea.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/02/17/0272431614523133.abstract

Written by Lisa van der Heijden, Clinical Psychologist, Susanne E. Baumgartner and Wouter D. Weeda.

If you are interested to know and learn more therapy for children/adolescents, contact me at Promises Healthcare on +65 6397 7309 or email lisa@promises.com.sg.

Myth Busting Mental Health – Youth Suicide

Myth Busting Mental Health – Youth Suicide

youth-suicideLet’s take a look at some common mental health myths about youth suicide and set the record straight.

Attempted suicides are just a cry for attention.

A suicide attempt should never be dismissed as ‘just a cry for attention’. A young person is highlighting that their level of internal distress is unmanageable and unbearable. They need help, not judgement. A young person can feel even more isolated and misunderstood if those around them fail to take their actions seriously. Never ignore or minimise suicidal behaviours and seek professional help as soon as possible.

Teens who cut their wrists must be suicidal.

Cutting is a form of self-injury that can either be suicidal or non-suicidal. In both cases, the cutting is a sign that a young person is not managing their internal distress in a healthy way. Any young person who self-injures should undergo a full suicide risk assessment by a registered mental health professional.

If I ask a young person whether they are feeling suicidal, it might put the idea in their head.

This is a particularly dangerous myth as it discourages discussion of the issue at hand. Talking about suicidal feelings will not encourage a young person to commit suicide. When having the conversation try to stay calm and non-confrontational. Remain open and genuine, and remember the overall message – it is ok to talk about feelings, and there is help available. Show that you care and avoid judging the young person. If you are uncomfortable or unsure about having the conversation, get in touch with a mental health professional for some tips and guidance.

Written by Leeran Gold, Psychologist in our Forensic Service.

At Promises Healthcare, we are committed to helping you through your journey to recovery. Discover a new life, away from addiction and find renewed hope. If you or someone you know needs mental health support, please contact our clinic on: +65 6397 7309 or email: clinic@promises.com.sg for inquiries and consultations.

For after-hours crisis support contact your local mental health service or emergency services.

In Singapore: IMH 24-hour helpline +65 6389 2222, Ambulance 995.

Working with clients who grapple with sexual compulsivity

Working with clients who grapple with sexual compulsivity

Register Today

This is an introductory workshop presented by Samuel Lee on the various theories of sexual compulsivity ( also sometimes referred to as ‘sexual addiction’) and its development.

Case studies will be shared to illustrate how various psychotherapeutic interventions can be applied when working with such clientele.

Target Audience

This course will be useful for all those in helping professions like counsellors, doctors, social workers, therapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and also lay people working with addictions.

Date:  11th May 2016

Cost: $60 ( before GST)

Register at http://events.promises.com.sg/event-planner/

The Wonder of Spontaneity

The Wonder of Spontaneity

For those of us who experience life as monotonous and rather soul-sucking there’s good news!

Through accessing your spontaneity and creativity you can feel ALIVE.

Our psychodrama and sociodrama workshops assist the return of playfulness and fun.

One of the participants, Geralidine, commented “In my first workshop, I didn’t know what was going on, but the positive energy drew me in and soon I was participating in a positive way, I lead workshops today to help others find their inner visionary self-lover. This theatre of spontaneity is both rejuvenating and healing”

To find out more about upcoming Psychodrama workshops, please contact our clinic on

6397 7309 or email psychodrama@promises.com.sg

Written by: Sharmini Winslow – Therapist, Promise Healthcare

Chill Skills – Managing Anger for 14 – 16 Year Olds

Chill Skills – Managing Anger for 14 – 16 Year Olds

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A CBT-based approach to helping your teenager manage his/her anger.

Adolescents in this group will be encouraged to identify their angry feelings, problem solve and express them in various productive ways.

Parents will also be required to attend 2 sessions where they will be taught strategies to help support their child.

Thursday 4.30 – 5.30 pm
(9 week programme)

*Limited to 7 participants per group. Between ages of 14-16 years old.

Call us for more information: (65) 63977309 or info@promises.com.sg