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Employee Assistance Program

Employee Assistance Program

There has been a growing awareness of the need for mental health wellness in corporate work settings. For one, employers are recognizing how work stress negatively impacts an individual’s job performance and productivity. According to a survey reported by Forbes, 31% of responding employees experience extremely high levels of stress at work, thereby affecting productivity and innovation.

Thus, as reported by the Straits Times on 25 March 2019, companies have started to view wellness programs not only as an employee benefit or responsibility, but also as performance strategy for the company.

In today’s world, such work stress seems inevitable due to competition, cost-cutting measures, and the intrusion of work into our personal lives through technology. Few cope well with sustaining these increasing demands and pressures in their work place. Thus, companies that are committed to safeguarding their employees’ mental well-being are empowering them with tools to manage their stress at work.

Such tools are available at Promises Healthcare through our Employee Assistance Program (“EAP”). The EAP is premised on the belief that mental health has a direct correlation to the performance and productivity of the employee. Appropriate outlets for employees to address their psychological concerns can help alleviate stress, leading to a positive and more balanced mental disposition. This in turn will contribute more effectively towards the goals of the organization.

Promises has developed and provided EAP services for a number of major corporations over the years. EAP services include Employee Training Packages, Critical Incident Intervention, Critical Incident Consultancy for Senior Management, Media Information Management, Individual and Group Counselling, Confidential Helpline services, and Family Support programs.

Currently, Promises is actively providing EAP services to

  • Singapore Press Holdings,
  • Exyte Singapore Pte. Ltd.,
  • Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS),
  • Connexion Asia,
  • Carrot Consulting,
  • Allianz,
  • Prudential,
  • MSIG,
  • Australia and New Zealand Banking Group (ANZ),
  •  Infocomm Media Development Authority (IMDA Singapore),
  • Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA)
  • Defence Science and Technology Agency (DSTA) and more.

Our customer references include present and past clients, such as the

  • Ministry of Health,
  • SCORE,
  • Institute of Mental Health,
  • Ministry of Social and Family Development (MSF),
  • Singapore Prison Services,
  • Singapore Association for Mental Health (SAMH),
  • Singapore Red Cross,
  • Nanyang Technological University (NTU),
  • National University of Singapore (NUS),
  • Ngee Ann Polytechnic (NP),
  • Temasek Polytechnic (TP) ,
  • Singapore Polytechnic (SP),
  • LASALLE College of the Arts,
  • Singapore Police Force etc.
Practical Stress Management Strategies For Legal Professionals

Practical Stress Management Strategies For Legal Professionals

Amongst lawyers, one of the leading causes given for mid-career abandonment is burnout. Promises Healthcare partnered with the Law Society of Singapore for a two hour professional development seminar aimed at addressing this issue by providing legal professionals with practical stress management strategies.

The President of the Law Society, Mr. Gregory Vijayendran, delivered the opening address to an eager crowd stating, ‘Burnout is one of the elephants in the room that we (legal professionals) need to address…Today we will talk about it.’

Dr. Munidasa Winslow, Executive Director and Consultant Psychiatrist at Promises Healthcare, shared an engaging and thoughtful presentation. He outlined why lawyers are so prone to burnout, how they can identify the early warning signs, and how to prevent burnout. Dr. Winslow also spoke about how lawyers in the areas of family and criminal law can develop compassion fatigue and suffer from vicarious traumatization.

Mr. Paul Seah, Senior Partner at Tan Kok Quan Partnership, presented ten key points on how lawyers can create work-life balance. He touched on generational differences, particularly among millennials and senior lawyers, and encouraged young professionals to identify their priorities and set their boundaries firmly to avoid burnout.

Here are some key takeaways from the seminar:

  • Burnout is a serious problem that can lead to adverse physical and mental health and has a detrimental impact on families, relationships, friendships, and careers.
  • Whilst stress is a part of everyday life, high levels of chronic stress will lead to exhaustion and burnout.
  • Prevent burnout by engaging in active self-care on a daily basis.
  • Being willing to seek help is not a weakness but a sign of strength, self-respect, and professionalism.
  • The responsibility for preventing burnout falls on individuals as well as the organization in which they work. Individual changes should be supported by changes in workplace culture led by senior management.

Contact Promises Healthcare if you or your organization would like to learn more about navigating professional burnout and managing stress. We provide individual training, employee assistance programs, as well as workshops and seminars for groups.

Myth Busting Teen Mental Health – Self-Harm

Debunking myths about adolescent mental healthviolence-self-harm

Although society has made some headway in reducing the stigma and misinformation about general mental health issues, the public’s understanding of self-harm remains decades behind. Let’s debunk some common myths about adolescent self-harm.

Myth: ‘Self-harm means cutting right? Only emos and goths do that.’

Self-harm refers to a range of behaviours that are purposely inflicted to cause damage to the body. It can include cutting, but also refers to scratching, picking at wounds, burning, pinching, hitting, head banging, and minor overdosing. Self-harm can also be in the form of excessive risk-taking that is above and beyond typical adolescent risk-taking.

It is a misconception that only ’emos’ and ‘goths’ self-harm. Although self-harm can be part of adolescent subculture experimentation, it is more often a sign that a teenager is experiencing unmanageable distress. Self-harm becomes a way of coping with distress that provides temporary relief from emotional pain.

Myth: ‘Self-harm is all about attention-seeking. If a person was really depressed enough to cut themselves then they would probably just commit suicide.’

Self-harm is not about attention-seeking. It is often a secretive and private behaviour. For a teenager, self-harm is a way of coping with unmanageable distress, and can be a medium to communicate that distress to others. Self-harm should never be dismissed as attention-seeking.

A person who cuts themselves is not necessarily suicidal. Cutting behaviour can be suicidal, non-suicidal, or a mix of both. It is important to remember that suicide risk is not static. A teenager who displays non-suicidal self-harm can become suicidal at another point in time.

Any teen who self-harms should undergo a thorough and comprehensive suicide risk assessment by a registered mental health professional. Their suicide risk should be closely monitored and assessed at regular intervals.

Myth: ‘I can punish my teen so that they stop self-harming. That will solve the problem.’

Punishing a teen for self-harming does not solve the problem. Cutting is a symptom of a deeper issue – unmanageable distress. Stopping the cutting via punishment may actually worsen their distress, especially if the teen lacks healthy and effective coping strategies.

Here are some suggestions for what you can do instead of punishing your teen:

  • Be an active listener
  • Validating their feelings
  • Be emotionally and physically present for them
  • Engage in joint problem solving

Always seek advice from a registered child psychologist if you suspect that your teen may be self-harming.

Written by Leeran Gold, Psychologist in our Forensic Service.

At Promises Healthcare, we are committed to helping you through your journey to recovery. Discover a new life and find renewed hope. If you or someone you know needs mental health support, please contact our clinic for inquiries and consultations.

For after-hours crisis support contact your local mental health service or emergency services.

In Singapore: IMH 24-hour helpline +65 6389 2222, Ambulance 995.

Myth Busting Mental Health – Youth Suicide

Myth Busting Mental Health – Youth Suicide

youth-suicideLet’s take a look at some common mental health myths about youth suicide and set the record straight.

Attempted suicides are just a cry for attention.

A suicide attempt should never be dismissed as ‘just a cry for attention’. A young person is highlighting that their level of internal distress is unmanageable and unbearable. They need help, not judgement. A young person can feel even more isolated and misunderstood if those around them fail to take their actions seriously. Never ignore or minimise suicidal behaviours and seek professional help as soon as possible.

Teens who cut their wrists must be suicidal.

Cutting is a form of self-injury that can either be suicidal or non-suicidal. In both cases, the cutting is a sign that a young person is not managing their internal distress in a healthy way. Any young person who self-injures should undergo a full suicide risk assessment by a registered mental health professional.

If I ask a young person whether they are feeling suicidal, it might put the idea in their head.

This is a particularly dangerous myth as it discourages discussion of the issue at hand. Talking about suicidal feelings will not encourage a young person to commit suicide. When having the conversation try to stay calm and non-confrontational. Remain open and genuine, and remember the overall message – it is ok to talk about feelings, and there is help available. Show that you care and avoid judging the young person. If you are uncomfortable or unsure about having the conversation, get in touch with a mental health professional for some tips and guidance.

Written by Leeran Gold, Psychologist in our Forensic Service.

At Promises Healthcare, we are committed to helping you through your journey to recovery. Discover a new life, away from addiction and find renewed hope. If you or someone you know needs mental health support, please contact us today for inquiries and consultations.

For after-hours crisis support contact your local mental health service or emergency services.

In Singapore: IMH 24-hour helpline +65 6389 2222, Ambulance 995.

Working with clients who grapple with sexual compulsivity

Working with clients who grapple with sexual compulsivity

Register Today

This is an introductory workshop presented by Samuel Lee on the various theories of sexual compulsivity ( also sometimes referred to as ‘sexual addiction’) and its development.

Case studies will be shared to illustrate how various psychotherapeutic interventions can be applied when working with such clientele.

Target Audience

This course will be useful for all those in helping professions like counsellors, doctors, social workers, therapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and also lay people working with addictions.

Date:  11th May 2016

Cost: $60 ( before GST)

Register at http://events.promises.com.sg/event-planner/